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Treellion Park

The one and only green public space remoted from traffic in Phnom Penh.

An islet with a few fishermen and farmer families, Koh Pich (Diamond Island) has gone through a spectacular urban development in the last twenty years.

Saved from concrete and high-rise expansion, Treellion was created at the end of the 1990s as a haven of nature where couples and young families could stroll among a collection of statues celebrating love -- it was then called The Love Garden -- and fauna. In the center, a sculpture evoking the four-faced towers of the Bayon temple, the work of master sculptor Chantha ចន្ថា, still proudly stands.

Far from hectic traffic and close to the River, Treellion's trees and shrubs are a refuge for several rare species of birds, often spotted by bird watchers.

Birdies Mini Golf

Recently opened, the first Phnom Penh miniature golf with 18 holes is already popular with Phnom-Penhers looking for some exercise and fun in a green environment.

A much loved outdoor golf game that anyone in the family can play.

Book your fun time at Birdies Mini Golf

Food Court for All

Get a snack and a drink at a food stand while strolling the green alleys or sitting on a bench at Treelion Park. Visit TheGlass Housefor al fresco or indoors cocktails and meals. And coming soon, enjoy an open-air cinema session, a live music event and a ride on The Bus!

Koh Pich in the late 1990s

Treellion Wonders

A park sprinkled with fantasy and magic.

The Whale

Let's start with "The Whale", surrounded with its two-dozen frolicking dolphins. Urban legend has it that the giant fossil was discovered in the muddy banks of the island in the 1990s, during the excavations for the future building sites.

Not to be confused with the laughing dinosaur statue nearby, this relic from a Mekong River and oceanic cetacean has not been dated nor clearly identified so far, even if some imaginative minds saw a Megalodon (Otodus megalodon), an extinct species of mackerel shark that lived during the Miocene and Pliocene eras.

Our guess is this is the skeleton of a Rice's Whale (Balaenoptera edeni), a species added in 2017 to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Similar skeletons are displayed, for instance, at the Nha Trang National Oceanographic Museum (Vietnam) and the Sabah Museum (Malaysia) -- see photos below.

The Statues

Scattered around the park are some 175 statues added to the Bayon-like sculpture by state sculptor Chantha, the author of King Norodom Sihanouk's Memorial bronze statue, after the Cambodian government decided to create a recreative park in Koh Pich.

With their unique mix of lyrical celebration of love, kitschy depiction of real and imaginary animals, and pure fantasy, the statues will be soon redecorated by teams of art students and street art creators.